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Warre hive inspection checklist?


#1

Hello All,

I’m looking for an apiary inspection checklist and the only ones I’m coming across on-line is for Langstroths. Does anyone have a suggestion for a checklist applicable to Warres? If not, I’ll just go off the Langstroth one and ignore all the chemical treatments and manipulations.

thanks!

Judith


#2

I have compiled a checklist which allows me to document all I observe and learn when I visit my Warre hives. This checklist could also be used to document Kenyan top bar hive visits or even chemical-free Langstroth visits.

I have found it very helpful to document each hive visit. I wish I’d started earlier (fifth year beekeeping but only first documenting visits!).

When I went to attach my checklist as a doc and as a txt, I got messages saying the extension doc/txt is not allowed. So you will find the checklist below my name. Feel free to use and share.

all the best,

Judith

Checklist for Visiting Beehive - All Senses Engaged

Hive Name:

Hive Location:

Date:

Time of Day:

Weather conditions:

Temperature:

Wind:

Humidity:

Surrounding area

What plants and trees are in bloom in surrounding area?

Are foraging bees observed in surrounding garden or orchard?

Is water source full and are bees observed at provided water source?

Temperament of hive today:

Sound of Hive (pleasant constant mm or sound distressed or weak or have sound of virgin piping queen/s):

Scent of Hive (sweet smelling or any smell of disease):

Warmth of Hive (touch hand or cheek to hive especially in cool weather to assess warmth):

Observed through the windows

New comb building observed:

Honey comb (thick comb) observed:

Brood comb (thinner comb) observed:

Developing queen cells seen:

Empty queen cells seen:

Observed on Bottom Board

Varroa drop count:

Presence of chewed cappings:

Presence of new wax flakes:

Observations at the Hive Entrance

Any bearding on the hive? (most likely warm day)

Any fanning bees (most likely warm day):

Any guard bees active:

Orientation flights observed (mid-day):

Pollen arriving observed, different colors:

Traffic per minute at the hive entrance:

Any presence of drones at or around entrance:

Any undertaker bees cleaning the hive:

Any dead bees outside hive, if so do any have deformed wings or other presence of disease:

Signs of animal disturbance such as skunk scratches or any birds such as blue jays eating bees:

Any ants or other insects seen on or around hive?

Propolised entrance (usually Autumn):

Yellow Jackets or other bees trying to rob (usually Autumn):

Drones evicted (Autumn):

Cleansing flights (Winter):

If opened the hive

Used smoke or not:

Queen seen:

Eggs seen:

Young larvae seen:

Laying pattern:

Number of combs of sealed brood:

Number of combs of open brood:

Number of combs of pollen:

Any stings:

Any photos?

Notes:

Actions: (such as renewed water source, added space in hive, added mouse guard, harvested honey)

list compiled by Judith Moran © 2013


#3

I’ve refined my Warre hive inspection checklist a little:

Warre Hive Inspection Checklist

Hive Name:

Location:

Date:

Time:

Sunny/Cloudy:

Temperature:

Wind:

Humidity:

If Biodynamic, is Day: Flower Fruit Root Leaf

Surrounding area:

What plants and trees are in bloom in surrounding area?

Are foraging honey bees or native bees observed in surrounding area?

Is water source full and are bees observed at provided water source?

Temperament of hive today:

Sound of Hive (pleasant constant mm or does hive sound weak or distressed or is there sound of virgin piping queen/s?):

Scent of Hive (sweet smelling or any smell of disease?):

Warmth of Hive (touch hand or cheek to hive especially in cool weather to assess warmth):

Observations at the Hive Entrance

Any bearding on the hive?

Any fanning bees:

Any guard bees active:

Orientation flights observed (mid day):

Pollen arriving observed, different colors:

Any presence of male bees at or around entrance:

Excessive number of male bees at entrance – more than 1 in 5 may suggest a laying worker:

Any undertaker bees cleaning the hive:

Estimated or actual traffic per minute at the hive entrance:

Any dead bees or larvae outside hive, if so do any have deformed or K wings or other presence of disease:

Any confused looking bees wandering around entrance as if drunk, (may suggest acute pesticide poisoning):

Signs of animal disturbance such as skunk scratches or any birds such as blue jays eating bees:

Any ants or small hive beetles or other insects seen around hive?

Propolised entrance (usually Autumn):

Yellow Jackets or other bees trying to rob (Autumn):

Male bees evicted (late Summer):

Cleansing flights (Winter):

Observed through the windows:

New comb building observed:

Honey comb (thick comb) observed:

Brood comb (thinner comb) observed:

Developing queen cells seen:

Empty queen cells seen:

Other:

Observed on Bottom Board:

Varroa drop count:

Presence of chewed cappings:

Presence of new wax flakes:

Other:

Before opening hive, remind yourself to stay calm in mind and body.

If opened the hive:

Added box or boxes from below:

Harvested box of honey from above:

Other:

Any stings:

Any photos:

Notes:

Actions: (such as renewed water source, added mouse guard, sprinkled baking powder around hive to deter ants)

Planned for next visit:

compiled by Judith Moran, 2013


#4

This is awesome! Thanks, Judith!